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Redditor _ValiumKnight__**_got the ball rolling with the following question, which immediately led me down the Ask Reddit rabbit hole:

Detectives/Police Officers of Reddit, what case did you not care to find the answer? Why?

Law enforcement professionals chimed in immediately to speak about some of their more unnerving cases.

CONTENT WARNING: Some sensitive content ahead.

Police work is not easy----and some cases are harder than others.

JamesIsTheDavis has had enough of cases involving juvenile offenders:

I loathe solving cases where a juvenile offender did it. Our juvenile justice system is a torment to victims, witnesses, and investigators. All of the following applies to Florida's Ninth Circuit. It may be significantly different in other states, and somewhat different elsewhere in Florida. In adult court, witnesses are given specific times to show up and know in advance that you are definitely going to testify. In juvenile court, on the day of court, you have to show up when the courtroom doors open, and sit there until the judge gets around to the juvenile's case. A significant amount of the time, the juvenile doesn't show up, so you have to come back the next time, and the judge is often unwilling to sign a custody order for a juvenile's failure to appear on a minor offense. The rest of the time (or so it seems), as soon as the defense sees that all the witnesses are there, they plead no contest. If even one of the witnesses doesn't show up (it seems) the prosecutors drop the case and those of us who bothered to show up have all wasted our time. And the judges never hold anyone in contempt for not showing up. It's one massive exercise in futility, and it gives juveniles the false impression that criminal justice is something to be laughed at and ignored. The minute they turn 18, the court system is so much more efficient (still not perfect, but outstanding when compared to juvenile justice) that they wind up with serious records right out the gate. Avoiding juvenile offenders is a part of why I work fraud crimes now. Juveniles tend not to be using stolen credit cards, passing forged checks, and engaging in schemes and cons.

JamesIsTheDavis

JamesIsTheDavis has had enough of cases involving juvenile offenders:
From MediocRedditor:

Child porn is the worst in general. It's one of those things where you want the bad guy to go away, but you really don't care to find the evidence.

MediocRedditor

From MediocRedditor:
Cases involving animals––From wrestlingnrj:

As a police officer, none of those things bother me, and I love a good pursuit. What gets me is seeing animals and young children get hurt. One of the worst memories I have was of a fire at a horse stable. Every stall had a different padlock on it from the specific owner because there was a good chance the horse would get stolen otherwise. My two partners and I had one pair of bolt cutters between us and we were cutting locks and trying to get as many horses out as we could before the building burned down around us. Luckily we were able to save about 30 horses, but listened to about 20 others burn to death. It was by far the most horrifying sound I've ever heard.

wrestlingnrj

Cases involving animals––From wrestlingnrj:
Cases involving sexual offenders––from RetardedDropBear:

Ex cop, NSW - Australia. 7 years. I really never wanted to find the answer to two particular murders in my area. 2 known sexual offenders were killed in the space of 8 weeks. One was a rock spider (pedophile), the other used to drug women. The 2 issues were unrelated. Only one of the alledged offenders was caught (also a scumbag 1%). He was released after a week due to lack of evidence. I know it's bad to wish death on people but these two blokes were just rancid. As a cop it was my job to find the offenders but as a human I had no interest in solving the issue at all. Luckily I was never in charge of the investigations.

RetardedDropBear

Cases involving sexual offenders––from RetardedDropBear:
Sometimes it's a multitude of similar cases––From jo_thesiah:

Not one case or anything, but I would pay a lot of money to get rid of domestic violence if I could (and if I had a lot of money). Some of my worst memories of my time as an officer have to do with those calls.

jo_thesiah

Sometimes it's a multitude of similar cases––From jo_thesiah:
camp_anawanna_ found himself disturbed by a child abuse cover up.

(According to childhelp.org, there are more than _3.6 million referrals made to child protection agencies, _and these cases involve more than 6.6 million children each year.)

Last week a woman called 911 to report that the wind was loud and making too much noise. She wanted us to find out why it was so loud and if we could turn down the volume of the wind.

Added to better suit the post: We are often, if not always, dispatched to rescue calls depending on the severity/type, due to the fact that we are closer than FD. Responded to a 4 year old who was unconscious and vomiting. Without getting into the details, it didn't take long after my arrival to realize it was a cover up. My partner and I already knew where this incident was headed, but you keep your head down and try and do the job without getting emotional. Mother and father were both adamantly lying that the child had just eaten some junk food and had gone to sleep before he started vomiting. Without getting into the details, investigation revealed that the father was mad at the child for eating some junk food. So he grabbed the child by the ankles and swung him around the house into furniture all over the home, nearly killing him. It's one of those cases that you don't want to investigate, because you know ahead of time what the outcome is going to be how bad it's going to get.

_campanawanna_ __

camp_anawanna_ found himself disturbed by a child abuse cover up.
Sometimes, it's not the actual cases, but the bombshell that affects those left behind––From a former corrections officer, who deleted his/her username:

I was a Corrections Officer and we worked with the police on an almost daily basis. We'd get to chatting and I found, in my experience, cops hated car chases, they hated domestic disputes but most of all, they hated suicides. I don't think I know a cop who doesn't have a suicide story where they can actually tell the whole thing. Being a cop (and a Prison CO) puts you into contact with some of the lowest forms of human life, people for whom you couldn't shed a tear; but, it's the innocent people. The victims of car accidents, suicides and families of victims that really bother us. As a CO, I had a little old lady who'd take a 4 hour bus ride to come to the prison to speak with her nephew. He was a real piece of shit, but she'd knit him sweaters, show him the sweaters and say "I'll put this in the drawer for when you get out." She'd bring him food (which he could eat) and they'd talk and one of the COs would drive her back to the bus station. She broke my heart, it's always the people left behind or those suffering that really get to us.

Sometimes, it's not the actual cases, but the bombshell that affects those left behind––From a former corrections officer, who deleted his/her username:
From getthatsugarcrisp:

I had been alerted to a well known local philanthropist, turned up dead. These were the days where physician assisted euthanasia was illegal in most of the developed world. This man, I had known him quite well and he had been suffering from a very serious terminal illness that was going to kill him before his 40th birthday, shattering his family... Especially his 2 young children. He was always donating to local charities, he gave a struggling single mother $25,000 at Christmas one year so she could pay off her debts, repair her car, buy food and presents for her children. An autopsy had determined that he had been murdered, an intentional overdose of morphine. The Health Authority and Department of Justice wanted us to investigate and bring the person who essentially murdered him to justice. We chalked it up that there was no way we could ever determine who it was that killed him. Years later, his wife sent our department a letter saying she gave her husband the lethal dose to put him out of his misery. I wish I had never known.

From getthatsugarcrisp:
Which prompted this response from alysia415:

I have been working in child welfare for about six years and last year I was able to attend an amazing two day "Speaking Of Children" conference. Part of that conference was having the option to spend time on computers in a separate room with law enforcement officials and people who work with the Innocence Lost Project. They had hundreds of thousands of pictures (probably more) for us to look through that was essentially CP. The goal was to look beyond the children and try to recognize the setting/location of the photo in an effort to narrow down where the photo may have been taken. About half an hour of that had me crying in my beer all night at home. Big kudos to the amazing people who work with that all the time and bring these children home and deal with those scum bags.

alysia415

Which prompted this response from alysia415:
yosemitessambo had a similarly distressing story to share:

Not verified as LEO but I'm sharing. Had an 18-month-old murdered by his mom's boyfriend. Don't know if it was intentional or accidental. Mom finds the kid after she gets off work. He's staged in his crib all tucked in but had been dead for several hours. Suspect had cut his wrists, written an apology in his blood on the bathroom wall "I'm sorry Tammy". The suspect had laid down in bed to wait to bleed out. Both wrists. We could tell because of the blood pooling on the bed. It took too long so the suspect got up and left the house. I didn't care to find him to save him from his suicide attempt. I guess the crime was solved we knew who had done it. I would have had to try to save the guy so he could go to court but his death was easier and seemed more just. It's part of the job though so we were going to look. Dicks put out a BOLO on his car. We got a hit immediately. The suspect had driven into a neighboring county out in the county. He drove into a concrete barrier. They estimated he was going about 80mph. He wasn't belted in and was ejected through the windshield. The vehicle rolled and landed on him. The coroner couldn't tell which impact killed him. This was some years ago. The guys on the case all got grand cordon awards. I wear the ribbon on my class A's. We didn't do anything though really. It's just a reminder of how fucked up it gets. I still remember the kids full name. His mother's name. I remember my Sargent saying "hasn't been down long he's got a full belly" while I hooked up an AED and my partner did CPR. I Remember thinking "he's not full his stomach is distended he's been down to long", while we tried to save a dead child. That is the time I didn't want to find a suspect.

yosemitessambo

yosemitessambo had a similarly distressing story to share:
And a slightly more humorous story from reirarei, who no one would blame for giving readers some breathing room after poring over some of these cases:

A hooker with a nasty attitude screamed at me for fifteen minutes about how a check one of her less scrupulous clients had given her had bounced. Considering she didn't know who he was or where we could find him, and we weren't about to set up 24/7 surveillance to identify her John, we told her in no certain terms, to next time, take cash.

H/T:Ask Reddit

reirarei

And a slightly more humorous story from reirarei, who no one would blame for giving readers some breathing room after poring over some of these cases:
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